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A comparative study of aviation safety briefing media: card, video, and video with interactive controls
Authors: Chittaro L.
Published in: Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, 85, December 2017, pp. 415-428.
Abstract: Passengers’ safety knowledge is a key factor in determining the chance of surviving any life- or injury-threatening situation that could occur in civil aviation. Aviation regulations require airlines to provide safety briefings to inform passengers of safety procedures on board. The safety briefing card and the safety briefing video are the two media that airlines routinely employ on board to this purpose. Unfortunately, research on aviation safety briefing media has cast serious doubts about their efficacy, urging researchers to better understand what makes safety briefing media effective as well as improving their effectiveness. This paper contributes to such goals in two different ways. First, it proposes the introduction of interactive technology into aviation safety briefings for improving their effectiveness. Second, it illustrates a controlled study that compares the effectiveness of three safety briefing media: the two briefing media that airlines currently employ on-board (safety briefing card and safety briefing video) and a safety briefing video extended with basic interactive controls. The results obtained by the study highlight a superior effectiveness of the two video media over the card media for aviation safety briefings. Moreover, the video with interactive controls produced improvements over the card in a larger number of effectiveness measures than the traditional video. The paper includes a discussion of factors that can explain the better results obtained with the video conditions, and in particular the video with interactive controls, and of possible additional extensions to increase the interactivity of aviation safety briefings.